Tuesday, June 11, 2013
Jenna Fischer, actor — a wistfully sweet remembrance of acting with directors and camera people — as heard on NPR Fresh Air 

INTERVIEWER: So, when you’re giving one of your pained looks or one of your: this is absurd, looks to the camera, who’s the camera person? Is there an actor behind there that you can kind of, like, interact with? Or is it just, like, the camera with a camera person?
FISCHER: Well, there’s two different scenarios. When we’re just shooting the show and it’s a scene, the camera operator is this man named Randall Einhorn. And he’s our director of photography. And we will look at him, we’ll give him the look, or we’ll look into the camera at him. And he’s become another character or another actor on the show to us. So, we do actually act with him.
And it’s really cute - whenever Pam smiles at the camera, Randall can’t help but smile back. The man, Randall, smiles at you while he’s holding the camera. And there are scenes that we’ve done that have been really touching. And you’ll look at Randall, and he’ll be, you know, sort of teared up.
And when we shoot our talking heads - our interview segments - the director of the episode serves as our documentarian for that week. Some of the directors, we have them back again, and again, and again. And one director we’re particularly attached to is Ken Kwapis. He directed our very first episode, and he comes back every year and directs a couple of episodes. And last year, he directed the finale. And he’s always taken a particular interest in Pam and her journey. So, I feel very close to him.
And in that moment, when Jim burst into the conference room while Pam’s giving an interview, and he finally asks her out on a date, I turned to the camera. And in the moment that they used, I’m sort of tearing up. And the reason that I teared up was because when I looked back at the camera, I saw Ken Kwapis. And he - his eyes were full of tears. And he smiled at me and gave me a little wink, like, that’s right. You finally got what you wanted, sweetie.
And it just, oh, it was a really powerful moment between me and the director. So it’s interesting. There’s a lot of acting that happens on the show that is with our crew members or, you know, people - that doesn’t normally happen when you’re making a movie or a television show.

Photo: hollywoodreporter.com

Jenna Fischer, actor — a wistfully sweet remembrance of acting with directors and camera people — as heard on NPR Fresh Air 

INTERVIEWER: So, when you’re giving one of your pained looks or one of your: this is absurd, looks to the camera, who’s the camera person? Is there an actor behind there that you can kind of, like, interact with? Or is it just, like, the camera with a camera person?

FISCHER: Well, there’s two different scenarios. When we’re just shooting the show and it’s a scene, the camera operator is this man named Randall Einhorn. And he’s our director of photography. And we will look at him, we’ll give him the look, or we’ll look into the camera at him. And he’s become another character or another actor on the show to us. So, we do actually act with him.

And it’s really cute - whenever Pam smiles at the camera, Randall can’t help but smile back. The man, Randall, smiles at you while he’s holding the camera. And there are scenes that we’ve done that have been really touching. And you’ll look at Randall, and he’ll be, you know, sort of teared up.

And when we shoot our talking heads - our interview segments - the director of the episode serves as our documentarian for that week. Some of the directors, we have them back again, and again, and again. And one director we’re particularly attached to is Ken Kwapis. He directed our very first episode, and he comes back every year and directs a couple of episodes. And last year, he directed the finale. And he’s always taken a particular interest in Pam and her journey. So, I feel very close to him.

And in that moment, when Jim burst into the conference room while Pam’s giving an interview, and he finally asks her out on a date, I turned to the camera. And in the moment that they used, I’m sort of tearing up. And the reason that I teared up was because when I looked back at the camera, I saw Ken Kwapis. And he - his eyes were full of tears. And he smiled at me and gave me a little wink, like, that’s right. You finally got what you wanted, sweetie.

And it just, oh, it was a really powerful moment between me and the director. So it’s interesting. There’s a lot of acting that happens on the show that is with our crew members or, you know, people - that doesn’t normally happen when you’re making a movie or a television show.

Photo: hollywoodreporter.com

Notes

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